Ciambra
22 November 2017

NEAPOLETANHEART

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NEAPOLETANHEART (CUORE NAPOLETANO)

NEAPOLETANHEART (CUORE NAPOLETANO)

original title:

CUORE NAPOLETANO

directed by:

cast:

Jimmy Roselli, Jerry Vale, Rita Berti, John Gentile, Enzo Gragnaniello, Peppe Barra

presented by:

Ready Made

production:

Ready Made, Tele +, supported by MiBACT

distribution:

country:

Italy

year:

2002

film run:

94'

format:

colour

release date:

06/09/2002

festival & awards:

Neapofitan Heart is the story of a journey that a small film crew took through several North American states as well as Naples and its suburbs, in the space of one year, in search of any trace that would lead them back to the classic Neapolitan songs.
The starting point was: Do the feelings that gave birth to traditional Neapolítan music still exíst? What díd the lyrics of the songs express? Who are their interpreters today?
Testo CD Ita Testo CD Eng Testo In Lavorazione Lancio Ita Lancio Eng Autore Pezzo Traduttore Data(giorno - mese - anThe film, with the help of images from silent movies from the period in which traditional Neapolitan music was born, focuses on several notable personalities within the ltalian-Amerícan music scene, including Jimmy Roselli, Jerry Vale and Rita Berti; as well as singers in Naples, like Mirna Doris, Enzo Gragnianiello, Maria Nazionale and Peppe Barra. But there are also unknown musicians, genuine discoveries, both in America and Naples, such as John Gentile, Luigi Todisco, and Francesca Marini. Traditional Neapolitan music ? despite its folkloristic attributes, the rhetoric surrounding it and the nostalgia of bygone times ? is still extremely popular today. lts allure transcends the songs themselves. it is one of the most climactic moments in which the real Neapolitan soul is verified.
We found Neapolitan music in the casinos of Atlantic City; in the streets of New York's ltalian neighborhoods,? in the bars of the remotest corners of America, where singers who have been living in the U.S. for perhaps thirty years present themselves as having just arrived in the country. We found it following Neapolitan singers who perform at weddings, serenades, street concerts and family reunions, and often found ourselves in unpredictable situations, with unusual people. Like, for instance, the Ukrainian music teacher who, upon arriving in Naples with no money and no work, began singing Neapolitan songs and playing his guitar on the Chiaia train líne, in the local dialect and in Ukrainian, becoming a big hit among the passengers.